Skip to content

Sallie Coyne for Rookwood Pottery
Scenic Vellum Harbor Vase

Sallie Coyne for Rookwood Pottery  Scenic Vellum Harbor Vase 1
Sallie Coyne for Rookwood Pottery  Scenic Vellum Harbor Vase 1
Height: 8 inches
American, 1910

This cylindrical vase by longtime Rookwood artist Sallie Coyne (1876-1939) depicts an atmospheric moonlit harbor scene, enhanced by the use of Rookwood’s signature “Scenic Vellum” glaze.

A pair of anchored sailboats, with furled sails, are silhouetted in the middle of a harbor against a receding landscape spotted with dark trees and a few buildings in the distance. A bright full moon hangs low in the sky, its soft light, reflected in crisp ripples of the water, diffusing throughout the scene.

Coyne was an artist at Rookwood for over three decades and was known for her landscapes; a student of the Cincinnati Art Academy, she was first hired by Rookwood in 1891 and remained one of their key artists until she eventually left the firm in 1931.

Rookwood Pottery, founded in Cincinnati, Ohio by Maria Longworth Nichols in 1880, gained international recognition early in its history and is still widely considered America’s finest art pottery. The firm enjoyed widespread success almost from its inception, winning a gold medal at the 1889 Paris World’s Fair and participating in numerous World’s Fairs where pieces were sold to major museums both at home and abroad.

In 1904 Rookwood introduced the Scenic Vellum glaze, a hybrid between the transparent gloss glaze and a matte finish, a finish which won the firm yet another grand prize at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis. The nature of the glaze lent itself to scenes that reflected the American Tonalist movement: quiet landscapes marked by hazy atmospheres, a stream or pond bordered by trees, and scenes depicting shifting quality of light.
Sallie Coyne for Rookwood Pottery  Scenic Vellum Harbor Vase 2
Sallie Coyne for Rookwood Pottery  Scenic Vellum Harbor Vase 2
Height: 8 inches
American, 1910

This cylindrical vase by longtime Rookwood artist Sallie Coyne (1876-1939) depicts an atmospheric moonlit harbor scene, enhanced by the use of Rookwood’s signature “Scenic Vellum” glaze.

A pair of anchored sailboats, with furled sails, are silhouetted in the middle of a harbor against a receding landscape spotted with dark trees and a few buildings in the distance. A bright full moon hangs low in the sky, its soft light, reflected in crisp ripples of the water, diffusing throughout the scene.

Coyne was an artist at Rookwood for over three decades and was known for her landscapes; a student of the Cincinnati Art Academy, she was first hired by Rookwood in 1891 and remained one of their key artists until she eventually left the firm in 1931.

Rookwood Pottery, founded in Cincinnati, Ohio by Maria Longworth Nichols in 1880, gained international recognition early in its history and is still widely considered America’s finest art pottery. The firm enjoyed widespread success almost from its inception, winning a gold medal at the 1889 Paris World’s Fair and participating in numerous World’s Fairs where pieces were sold to major museums both at home and abroad.

In 1904 Rookwood introduced the Scenic Vellum glaze, a hybrid between the transparent gloss glaze and a matte finish, a finish which won the firm yet another grand prize at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis. The nature of the glaze lent itself to scenes that reflected the American Tonalist movement: quiet landscapes marked by hazy atmospheres, a stream or pond bordered by trees, and scenes depicting shifting quality of light.
Sallie Coyne for Rookwood Pottery  Scenic Vellum Harbor Vase 3
Sallie Coyne for Rookwood Pottery  Scenic Vellum Harbor Vase 3
Height: 8 inches
American, 1910

This cylindrical vase by longtime Rookwood artist Sallie Coyne (1876-1939) depicts an atmospheric moonlit harbor scene, enhanced by the use of Rookwood’s signature “Scenic Vellum” glaze.

A pair of anchored sailboats, with furled sails, are silhouetted in the middle of a harbor against a receding landscape spotted with dark trees and a few buildings in the distance. A bright full moon hangs low in the sky, its soft light, reflected in crisp ripples of the water, diffusing throughout the scene.

Coyne was an artist at Rookwood for over three decades and was known for her landscapes; a student of the Cincinnati Art Academy, she was first hired by Rookwood in 1891 and remained one of their key artists until she eventually left the firm in 1931.

Rookwood Pottery, founded in Cincinnati, Ohio by Maria Longworth Nichols in 1880, gained international recognition early in its history and is still widely considered America’s finest art pottery. The firm enjoyed widespread success almost from its inception, winning a gold medal at the 1889 Paris World’s Fair and participating in numerous World’s Fairs where pieces were sold to major museums both at home and abroad.

In 1904 Rookwood introduced the Scenic Vellum glaze, a hybrid between the transparent gloss glaze and a matte finish, a finish which won the firm yet another grand prize at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis. The nature of the glaze lent itself to scenes that reflected the American Tonalist movement: quiet landscapes marked by hazy atmospheres, a stream or pond bordered by trees, and scenes depicting shifting quality of light.




Comments