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Edith Barretto Parsons
"Quiet Goat"

Edith Barretto Parsons "Quiet Goat" 1
Edith Barretto Parsons "Quiet Goat" 1
Edith Barretto Parsons (1878-1956)
Height: 4 inches
Width: 2 ⅛ inches
Depth: 4 ¼ inches

Edith Barretto Parsons’ charming bronze sculptures earned her widespread popularity in the early 20th century. She is best known for a series of fountains depicting playful youths paired with whimsical animal companions, many of which are prominently installed in the permanent collections of major institutions around the United States.

This sculpture of a timid baby goat was sculpted as one of a pair; According to the Gorham Manufacturing Company’s 1928 publication “Famous Small Bronzes,” which lists and illustrates these sculptures, Parson’s called this particular model the “quiet goat,” while she referred to its frolicking companion as the “dancing goat.” The publication also made note of the sculptor’s “apparent love of animals” which is “so evident in these pieces,” and recommended that the bronzes could be used either as small bookends or separate decorations.

This sculpture is marked with Parsons’ signature and the Gorham Foundry mark.

Parsons attended the Art Students League, where she was a student of Daniel Chester French and George Gray Barnard. She won several prizes and scholarships during her attendance, and was selected to carve the figures for the Liberal Arts Building at the 1904 St. Louis Exposition.

References:
Gorham Manufacturing Company, Famous Small Bronzes: A Representative Exhibit Selected from the Works of Noted Contemporary Sculptors (1928), p. 87.
Edith Barretto Parsons "Quiet Goat" 2
Edith Barretto Parsons "Quiet Goat" 2
Edith Barretto Parsons (1878-1956)
Height: 4 inches
Width: 2 ⅛ inches
Depth: 4 ¼ inches

Edith Barretto Parsons’ charming bronze sculptures earned her widespread popularity in the early 20th century. She is best known for a series of fountains depicting playful youths paired with whimsical animal companions, many of which are prominently installed in the permanent collections of major institutions around the United States.

This sculpture of a timid baby goat was sculpted as one of a pair; According to the Gorham Manufacturing Company’s 1928 publication “Famous Small Bronzes,” which lists and illustrates these sculptures, Parson’s called this particular model the “quiet goat,” while she referred to its frolicking companion as the “dancing goat.” The publication also made note of the sculptor’s “apparent love of animals” which is “so evident in these pieces,” and recommended that the bronzes could be used either as small bookends or separate decorations.

This sculpture is marked with Parsons’ signature and the Gorham Foundry mark.

Parsons attended the Art Students League, where she was a student of Daniel Chester French and George Gray Barnard. She won several prizes and scholarships during her attendance, and was selected to carve the figures for the Liberal Arts Building at the 1904 St. Louis Exposition.

References:
Gorham Manufacturing Company, Famous Small Bronzes: A Representative Exhibit Selected from the Works of Noted Contemporary Sculptors (1928), p. 87.
Edith Barretto Parsons "Quiet Goat" 3
Edith Barretto Parsons "Quiet Goat" 3
Edith Barretto Parsons (1878-1956)
Height: 4 inches
Width: 2 ⅛ inches
Depth: 4 ¼ inches

Edith Barretto Parsons’ charming bronze sculptures earned her widespread popularity in the early 20th century. She is best known for a series of fountains depicting playful youths paired with whimsical animal companions, many of which are prominently installed in the permanent collections of major institutions around the United States.

This sculpture of a timid baby goat was sculpted as one of a pair; According to the Gorham Manufacturing Company’s 1928 publication “Famous Small Bronzes,” which lists and illustrates these sculptures, Parson’s called this particular model the “quiet goat,” while she referred to its frolicking companion as the “dancing goat.” The publication also made note of the sculptor’s “apparent love of animals” which is “so evident in these pieces,” and recommended that the bronzes could be used either as small bookends or separate decorations.

This sculpture is marked with Parsons’ signature and the Gorham Foundry mark.

Parsons attended the Art Students League, where she was a student of Daniel Chester French and George Gray Barnard. She won several prizes and scholarships during her attendance, and was selected to carve the figures for the Liberal Arts Building at the 1904 St. Louis Exposition.

References:
Gorham Manufacturing Company, Famous Small Bronzes: A Representative Exhibit Selected from the Works of Noted Contemporary Sculptors (1928), p. 87.




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